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What’s Black and White and Red/Read All Over?

Posted on September 16th, 2018

As Jewish Museum Milwaukee prepares to launch Blacklist: The Hollywood Red Scare, one might ask: What’s Jewish or Milwaukee about the Hollywood Red Scare? The answer could be: What isn’t? Learn more about local and Jewish connections to the Hollywood Red Scare here.

Re-Education: A Collective Responsibility

Posted on August 22nd, 2018

In planning for the anticipated return of Stitching History From The Holocaust and the added stories of the Oelsner and Spira/Stern families, Jewish Museum Milwaukee was excited to present a timeline that would integrate their narratives with the Strnad’s and provide context for events surrounding World War II. Little did we know that in contextualizing the individual experiences that happened seventy-five years ago, we would encounter disturbing parallels to what we are witnessing in our world today.

Stitching History From the Holocaust: New Remnants

Posted on July 24th, 2018

Check out how Jewish Museum Milwaukee found additional photos and documents relating to Hedy Strnad and her family. These additions show the evolution of Stitching History From the Holocaust, but also demonstrate that historical research is never done. There will always be more archives to explore and people to connect with, but each small salient connection like these helps expand our understanding of the lived experience.

Engaged and Relevant: The Role of Jewish Museum Milwaukee

Posted on June 14th, 2018

JMM occupies a unique niche in the museum world in Milwaukee. We use the Jewish experience to build bridges between groups of people and between eras. We live our tagline “Where Conversations Happen” by looking at multiple perspectives of a topic or issue, by partnering with diverse organizations, by asking visitors to use critical thinking skills to contemplate commonalities and differences of a particular subject over time.

We Just Wanted to Say “THANKS”

Posted on November 14th, 2017

It is the time of the year to reflect upon those people and events that made the year special. At the Jewish Museum Milwaukee, we have so many people to thank: visitors, educators, docents, artists, members, donors, board and committee members.

A Message from our New President

Posted on July 20th, 2017

The first time I met Patti Sherman-Cisler, our executive director, she talked about museums providing transformative experiences. I, too, believe the stories we tell at JMM have the power to be inspirational and transformative for our visitors.

Happy Birthday Joey Sangor!

Posted on June 29th, 2017

Did you know Milwaukee was home to a well-known Jewish featherweight boxer during the 1920s?  Julius Singer, later known as Joey Sangor, was born on July 4th, 1903 in Russia.  In 1905, Sangor came to Milwaukee with his mother and two brothers (his father served in the Russo-Japanese War and joined the family later).  Why […]

In Honor of Memorial Day: The Arthur Grossman Collection

Posted on May 22nd, 2017

The Archives at the Jewish Museum Milwaukee recently received a collection of letters written by Arthur (Artie) J Grossman, a Jewish soldier from Milwaukee during World War II; they were donated by Lloyd Levin, Artie’s nephew. This collection of letters provides insight to what life was like for both Artie in the Army and his family in Milwaukee during World War II.

9 cheers for 9 years

Posted on April 27th, 2017

Jewish Museum Milwaukee has accomplished a lot in our first nine years—join us in celebrating NINE things that we want to cheer about. Which is your favorite? 1. Stitching History From the Holocaust This award-winning exhibit has been in five venues, and been seen by tens of thousands of visitors; it earned international media coverage and […]

What the “Fabric of Survival” Teaches

Posted on February 3rd, 2017

These scenes and accompanying text nag at us. Why the Jews? What power do we have over evil? How do we defend ourselves against irrational governments? How do we protect our most vulnerable citizens? What does it mean to be a refugee? And what responsibilities do we have for those being persecuted?